New Bass Strait ships for Toll

The 210m, 20,000-ton Victorian Reliance II is one of two new ships built by CSC Jinling Shipyard at Nanjing, China, for the Bass Strait trade. Photo courtesy of Paul Finnigan.

The 210m, 20,000-ton Victorian Reliance II is one of two new ships built by CSC Jinling Shipyard at Nanjing, China, for the Bass Strait trade. Photo courtesy of Paul Finnigan.

Those who keep an eye on shipping in Port Phillip might have noticed the Toll ships on the Tasmania run seem a little different. Painted the same shade of green and retaining the name ‘Toll’ in white on the sides, two new ships have replaced those previously on the run.  

The identical pair, named Tasmanian Achiever II and Victorian Reliance II, are the largest RoRo (roll-on/roll-off) ships ever used for domestic trade outside of Europe and the United States. The first of these was the winner of the 2018 Shippax RoRo Technology Award, announced on March 13 soon after the new ships began their service across Bass Strait. The Shippax Awards were launched in 1999 as a means of stimulating innovation and to promote noteworthy design features on newly delivered ferries, RoRos and cruise vessels.

Purpose-built for the Bass Strait trade, the ships have space for 700 twenty-foot containers, including facilities for 260 refrigerated units, 3500m of lane space for trailers, three decks, a car tween deck and wide access ramps. At 210m, they are 27m longer and can carry 40 per cent more cargo than the ships they have replaced. Being faster, they can save an hour on the crossing, allowing more time in port for handling cargo. The new ships are also kinder to the environment. Built to comply with strict standards on sulphur emissions, they have sophisticated on-board scrubbers to filter emissions and while in port they will connect to the local power grid, eliminating the need to have their diesel engines running to generate power.

Built by CSC Jinling Shipyard at Nanjing, China, the combined cost of the pair was in excess of $300 million. In addition to this expense, Toll is building bigger, wider and heavier shore ramps at its terminals at Webb Dock and Burnie to provide faster loading and unloading.

Readers with an interest in ships might like to know that the World Ship Society of Victoria meets monthly at the Port-Ed Centre at Fishermans Bend. For further information, see www.wss-vic.org au

BY MAURIE HUTCHINSON

President, Peninsula Ship Society

PSS Logo G&B.jpg

T: Maurie Hutchinson 9787 5780

E: [email protected]

The Peninsula Ship Society meets at Hastings Yacht Club on the fourth Tuesday of each month at 10am. Visitors always welcome.

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