Real-world education

 They call it the Energy Breakthrough, it runs for 24 hours and for the past three years Woodleigh’s Senior HPV Team have been first across the finish line. This year the team's gone all out, building a new, faster and more advanced machine to get them home in first place for a record four years in a row. Best of luck!

They call it the Energy Breakthrough, it runs for 24 hours and for the past three years Woodleigh’s Senior HPV Team have been first across the finish line. This year the team's gone all out, building a new, faster and more advanced machine to get them home in first place for a record four years in a row. Best of luck!

The pace of change in today’s world is unprecedented. By 2030, up to 85 per cent of today’s students will be performing jobs that do not yet exist. We know that the careers of these students will be far more fluid, that skills training and retraining will be permanent. The ability to gain new knowledge will be more valuable than the knowledge itself. Automation will replace many jobs, but real-world skills, or soft skills, are irreplaceable. 

Teamwork, creativity, problem-solving, communication — all the things robots can’t do become essential. More important still is the ability to be able to deal with change. The environmental, social, political and technological issues that Gen Z will face require them to contribute positively to their communities — today’s students need to be productive. They need to solve problems, collaborate, innovate and be prepared to challenge theories, ideals and conventions. This necessitates purposeful learning. It necessitates global understanding and respect.

These are the critical skills required for the success of each individual in the world. Research and data, both global and local, informs our school philosophy, our learning and teaching methodologies and guides our policies and procedures. This real-world understanding is why we focus on delivering an experiential education in a structured and measurable way.

Many schools offer experiential learning programs as part of their curriculum. For the most part, these are island experiences only. At Woodleigh, learning by doing is at our core. By offering a curriculum that is real, meaningful and in context, and an environment that is safe, supportive and respectful, deep learning occurs. The understanding of concepts, the acquisition of knowledge, the mastery of skills, the development of productive attitudes, and the ability to perform meaningful tasks come about naturally and remain with students long after they leave the school.

JONATHAN WALTER – Principal