Nutrition myth-busting By Kate Save

Do you feel confused about everything you read when it comes to nutrition and what to eat?  Or even more confused when it comes to weight loss? Well, I’m here to teach you how to decipher the truth.

 

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1)     CREDENTIALS — First, look at the credentials of the author. Are they an accredited practising dietitian? An accredited practising dietitian studies nutrition for a minimum of 4½ years, and this also includes clinical training and placement in hospitals to understand how food interacts with our bodies on a physiological level.  Basically, they should be able to tell you how food will affect your overall health, specifically any medical conditions and medication interactions if relevant. 

2)     EXPERIENCE — I do not want to discredit other nutrition health professionals who are not dietitians or to put all dietitians up on a pedestal either. As we all know, there are poor, average and excellent practitioners in every field. Therefore it is also important to consider not only what they studied or what degrees they hold but also how many years of experience they have.  Experience is essential in nutrition to understand how different individuals react to different nutritional therapy as a ‘one size fits all’ approach should never be taken. Rather, advice should be always tailored to the individual.

3)     BALANCE — Aside from establishing qualifications and experience, the last way to assess the integrity of the nutrition information provided is to ensure that the advice isn’t too radical in that it cuts out complete food groups or recommends synthetic supplements in the place of real food.  Our bodies are living beings and they seek a range of different foods to extract the important vitamins and minerals they need every day. 

 

If anyone reading this article is questioning why I am advocating Be Fit Food as a health professional (accredited practising dietitian, exercise physiologist and diabetes educator), it is honestly because I believe that our ‘real food’ approach to weight loss and healthy eating is an honest reflection of what a healthy and balanced diet should look like.  Be Fit Food is my own home recipes with four to 12 vegetables in every meal, no added sugar, low carb, optimal protein levels and suitable for anyone seeking the convenience of home-delivered meals. Just build your own program with more or less meals and snacks per day to suit your own health and weight loss goals.

 

Kate Save is an accredited practising dietitian, exercise physiologist and co-director of Be Fit Food in Mornington. For more info go to befitfood.com.au or phone 1300 2 MEALS (63257)