Indigenous arts in the Top End By Liz Rogers

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Indigenous artist and Baluk Arts operations co-ordinator Tallara Gray has just returned from this year’s Darwin Aboriginal Art Fair, held in the Northern Territory in August, on a high. This was her second year at the fair, which she says “felt so different from last year when my eyes were wide open with wonder”.

“This year I knew what to expect, although it was much bigger and there was more to see. It was a whirlwind but amazing.”

The first DAAF was held in 2007 and included 16 Aboriginal-owned incorporated art centres. In its 12th year, 2018’s DAAF was filled with artist workshops and demonstrations, artist talks, Indigenous food experiences, cultural performances and story-telling and coincided with such events as the National Indigenous Music Awards. More than 2000 Indigenous artists from across Australia were showcased with 100 per cent of revenue going back to remote communities.

As a descendant of the Yadhaigana people of Cape York, Tallara understands how important it is to ethically promote and support the artwork of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander art centres. She explains. “DAAF shows that we are a diverse people sharing our culture and that Aboriginal people in urban areas have a different artistic response. Baluk Arts is one of only two art centres from Victoria represented at the fair. This year there were four of us on the Baluk Arts stall. I took my jewellery made from natural materials, including kelp and river reed, sculptures and mixed media work and had a great response. I make all my work through Baluk Arts to ensure it is consumed ethically.”

This Frankston resident and Fine Art graduate from the Queensland University of Technology has been making art for as long as she can remember. She currently has work on show at The Gallery at Bayside Arts & Cultural Centre as part of the Freshwater/Saltwater exhibition, and at 25 she’s one of the youngest Indigenous artists to attend DAAF.

Top stuff, Tallara. The only way is up.

 

Exhibitions reflect McClelland’s diversity

 Annette Warner,  Atlas of Memory: (re)visualising Gordon Ford’s natural Australian garden  installation view. Photo: Christian Capurro.

Annette Warner, Atlas of Memory: (re)visualising Gordon Ford’s natural Australian garden installation view. Photo: Christian Capurro.

McClelland Sculpture Park+Gallery, celebrated as the home of Australian sculpture with a wide-ranging collection of more than 100 sculptures, comprises 8ha of designed landscape and vast areas of indigenous bushland. The exhibition program focuses on the development of modern sculpture and various forms of spatial practice, and encourages contemporary artists to develop and address challenging issues current in Australia and a global context.

The exhibition Black Paintings, by Karingal-based artist Sanné Mestrom, presents a series of free-standing woollen tapestries on steel frames accompanied by a suite of gouache paintings. The works celebrate the textural qualities of the painting surface and reference a series of canvases by American artist Frank Stella from the 1960s. Stella’s Black Paintings occupy a pivotal place in art history, and embody many of the contradictory impulses within late modernist artistic practice. As endearing objects encountered in the gallery space, Mestrom’s tapestries act as mirrors, not for reality but for the viewer’s self as a curious and complex perceptual being.

Also showing, Annette Warner’s Atlas of Memory: (re)visualising Gordon Ford’s natural Australian garden presents research by Annette Warner, School of Ecosystems & Forest Sciences, University of Melbourne. The exhibition comprises diverse archival material relating to the influential practice of mid to late 20th century landscape designer Gordon Ford. Ford was recently recognised as a person of national significance for his contribution to an Australian naturalistic approach to landscape design. Historically he is linked to the development of the Eltham creative movement and significant figures such as the architect Alistair Knox, photographer Sue Ford and other well‐known artists, writers and designers of this time.

Both exhibitions are on until November 11.

MCCLELLAND SCULPTURE PARK+GALLERY

A: 390 McClelland Drive, Langwarrin

T: 9789 1671

W: mcclellandgallery.com

 

Frankston City’s major event season announced

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Frankston City’s major event season has just been announced, with a huge line-up of entertainment on offer. Be sure to note these dates because you won’t want to miss out!
To start off the season is The Mayor’s Family Picnic on Sunday, September 9, at the Carrum Downs Recreation Reserve, kicking off at 11am with free family lawn games and activities including face painting and live entertainment to keep the kids happy and busy. A fantastic array of food stalls will provide tasty treats while traders in the know give free advice on what to see and experience in your own back yard.

Food trucks are all the go from October 10-14 on the Frankston Waterfront, and you’re in for some gourmet gustation. Returning for the third year in a row, the Food Truck Park presents Seaside Street Food Festival and serves up fresh international flavours, stellar live entertainment and an ambience that will transport you to anywhere your tastebuds are travelling. Graze your way through this aromatic and flavourful day with friends and family in a simply stunning Frankston locale.

Coming off the back of the Seaside Street Food Festival is Pets’ Day Out on Sunday, October 14, from 10am-3pm at Ballam Park, where you have the chance to speak to Frankston City Council’s animal management team about responsible pet ownership while you enjoy a bevy of free activities. There’s a kids’ photo booth and colouring in, prizes and giveaways, and all pets are welcome as long as they are vaccinated, on leads or securely contained.

The festive season begins with Frankston’s Christmas Festival of Lights on Saturday, November 24, in Davey St from 5pm onwards. Watch Santa’s grand arrival and meet him in his house, get started on your Christmas shopping while enjoying the culinary delights in the Gingerbread Land Festival Dining and watch the tree-lighting ceremony and fireworks display at 9.15pm.

Are you there yet? If not, then listen to this: the mighty Magic Dirt are re-forming after a 10-year hiatus for a massive concert in Frankston Park on Saturday, December 8, featuring Spiderbait, Killing Heidi, Bodyjar, Superheist, Hotter Than Hell (pictured) and more. Tickets for this 18+ rockfest are $79 and now on sale, so time is ticking if you want to launch into the festive season with a big, thumping bang.

For more information on these events and to see what Frankston City has lined up ready for 2019, head to visitfrankston.com or follow Visit Frankston on Facebook (visitfrankston) and Instagram (VisitFrankston) — as a teaser, The Waterfront Festival in February is going to be a cracker!

 

 

 

The warm shine of Beethoven’s healing power By Catherine Godony

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Mornington welcomes spring with the healing of Beethoven's compositions, their power drawn from the composer's own physical suffering, transformed into intensity and majestic beauty. 

Hosted by the Peninsula Music Society, the internationally acclaimed Fidelio Quartet performs on Saturday, September 15, at 7.30 pm at the accessible Peninsula Community Theatre (Melway ref: 145 E2).

The program features Quartet in D Major Opus 18, No 3 and Quartet in C Sharp Minor, Opus 131. These quartets are among 16 in the Beethoven cycle rendered with tremendous success at varying venues by the Fidelio Quartet. Artists Bobby Macindoe (violin), Isin Cakmakcioglu (violin), Lisa Grosman (viola) and Rachel Atkinson (violin/cello) bring rich experience and knowledge from an orchestral and chamber music background. On promise is a rendition of Beethoven to lift the soul and soothe the spirit.

Buy tickets at pmsmusic.asn.au/

 

 

Journey into the human form

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Liz Turner is a figurative and portrait artist based on the Mornington Peninsula and she is currently exhibiting at Whitehill Gallery in Dromana. 

Experiencing European galleries first-hand and sketching at the famous Academie de la Grande Chaumiere in Paris have enhanced Liz’s appreciation of the wider context of art in society and its traditions. Working in her preferred mediums of pastel and oils, her art reflects her fascination with both the human form and the human condition as observed in different cultures near and far.

Liz’s exhibition, Journey, is on until August 5 at Whitehill Gallery, cnr Whitehill and Boundary roads, Dromana. The gallery is open Friday-Sunday from 11am-5pm. Details: whitehillart.com.au

Discover Africa’s best-kept secret

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There are two sorts of travellers who go to Africa: those who want to tick places off a list and those who want to experience the essence of those places. For the latter, that sometimes means even avoiding the places you listed for others that best offer the experience you are after.

Hwange National Park in Zimbabwe is a good example of the latter.  Lost in the noise of your Krugers and Serengetis, this large national park flies under the radar of most safari-goers.  Neighbouring the far more famous Chobe National Park in Botswana, this park often shares animals with its famous neighbours (animals don’t need passports), including the elephant herds Chobe is known for.  What it doesn’t share are the herds of people that jam up the roads and make peaceful game viewing a challenge. 

Full of lions, leopards, herds of antelope and rarer animals such as the elusive wild dog, this area offers a step back in time where you can enjoy the call of the wild without the call of the mobile phone.  You’ll often find experienced African travellers here enjoying the slower pace and the solitude that ironically only comes when surrounded by animals of a different species.

If you want to clear items from a bucket list, go wherever you wish.  If it is the experience you are after, consider somewhere like Hwange.  Fame doesn’t always equal quality. In fact, some of the best-kept secrets are kept secret for a reason.

To unlock the secrets of Africa, it’s important to talk to the key people.  Peninsula Travel has sent many people to the hidden gems of Africa, working with respected partners like Bench Africa.  To discover your dream trip, talk to Peninsula Travel today.

PENINSULA TRAVEL

A: 9 Bay Rd, Mount Martha

T: 5974 3911

W: peninsulatravel.com.au

Holidays in the sky By Kate Sears

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Many people fly to their destination, but not everyone does an aircraft tour. Enter Kirkhope Aviation. This Outback air tour and charter company with more than 40 years’ experience is based at Moorabbin airport and has a long history as one of Australia’s most professional air tour operators, taking small groups of adventurers on some astonishing expeditions.

Kirkhope’s experienced commercial pilots fly a modern fleet of twin-engine aircraft designed for comfort and every guest receives a window seat, and using local ground tour operators means the experience can be enjoyed both in the air and on the ground. Tours vary from one to 14 days with groups generally ranging from six to 10 people.

Kirkhope will help you design your own Outback tour with its Bespoke Air Safari option, or you can choose from a range of packaged air tours, including the 13-day Cape York tour departing August 25 from $13,600 per person twin share, or a three or four-day Taste of the Outback (Lake Eyre) tour with multiple tour dates over the next three months from $3495 per person twin share. Other destinations include the Kimberley, Kangaroo Island, Tasmania and the islands of Bass Strait. Commercial, private and business charters are also available.

Australia’s most iconic destinations await — let Kirkhope Aviation take you there in style.

 

KIRKHOPE AVIATION

A: Hangar 7, Second St, Moorabbin airport
W: kirkhopeaviation.com.au
T: 1300 206 130

 

Colour master Coad celebrates 30 years with Manyung Gallery By Liz Rogers

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Opening on July 6 and running until July 22 at Manyung Gallery Mount Eliza, long-time Manyung exhibitor Peter Coad presents his new body of energy-charged infused work, Horizon, with reflective vibrancy.

Peter’s art comes from a place of organic expression that is intrinsically linked with the dramatic Australian landscape. Connected with wide-open space and the colour-coded hues it reveals, Peter is a master at capturing the spirit of the land through form, brush stroke and his deep understanding of the timelessness the Australian topography embodies.

Manyung Gallery’s partnership with this artist runs as deep as his keen eye for landscape. Peter has been exhibiting for 40 years and been with Manyung Gallery for 30, and his latest exhibition celebrates the partnership between artist, curator and collectors of his works and the insight into the shifting sands of time within remote locations.

Peter paints his scenes in the early morning or late in the afternoon, which “produces the most vibrant and powerful of all nature’s colours”. He explains: “Matisse once said: ‘Colours have the inherent power of affecting the feelings of those who look at them’. I certainly believe I can really appreciate the beauty of the world by painting it.”

When you view a piece of Peter’s art, you become spontaneously involved in the time, space and dramatic sense of light and shade it exudes. Having visited every state in Australia with his wife in their 4WD, Peter has hiked through thousands of remote locations. He has had 68 solo exhibitions and participated in more than 200 invited group exhibitions throughout Australia, Japan, the US, Malaysia, Singapore, Hong Kong and Spain. Impressive.

Come celebrate Peter’s colourful world at Manyung Gallery this winter. It’s your world too.

 

MANYUNG GALLERY GROUP

A: Sorrento, Mount Eliza, Malvern, Flinders and Mornington (factory)

T: 9787 2953 all sites

W: manyunggallery.com.au

Sweetie darling, we’re in Mornington! by Kate Sears

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You know their quips, you know their sayings, but did you know that the oh-so-fabulous Eddy, Patsy and Saffy will be gracing Mornington? Well, no. It’s actually the tribute show Fabulous? Absolutely! Confused? Don’t be. Just pour another glass of wine, darling. And another.

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“When I read that drinking was bad for you, I gave up reading,” said Patsy Stone on the hit television show that had a popular nine-season run.

Comedy Dining Company presents a fabulous comedy tribute evening. It’s time to join Eddy, Patsy and Saffy as they take you for a trip down memory lane. They’re all attending a gala —even Saffy has been dragged along — only for them to arrive and be told they’re not on the guest list. Disaster! But Patsy has a plan. After trying many ways to enter the party, in typical style they get hideously drunk and get thrown out.

Before you enjoy a three-course meal, be prepared to be called, “Oh, you little troll bitch from hell!” as the actors mingle with the guests at the bar before the show. Saffy will try to get a handle on the situation as Patsy and Eddy make a nuisance of themselves by trying to steal people’s drinks.

Doors open at 7pm, and the show starts at 7.30pm. Tickets are $89 a person and it’s well worth it to watch three of the best actors in the land give a performance that will not be forgotten as they recreate some of the iconic sketches from the series. Run, darling — there’s booze at the finish line … well, at the Brooklands of Mornington, so book now by phoning Cassandra on 5973 9200 or email [email protected]

BROOKLANDS OF MORNINGTON
A: 99-101 Tanti Ave, Mornington
T: 5973 9200
W: brooklandsofmornington.com.au

Champagne conversations with Janine Daddo By Liz Rogers

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Janine Daddo’s paintings celebrate the good things in life. Colour, form and emotion spring from this contemporary artist’s brush to tell the story of human interaction, connectivity and the understanding that life is there to be lived.

This Winter Wine Weekend, Janine will be exhibiting her ‘joie de vivre’ at the sensational Manyung Gallery in Ocean Beach Rd in Sorrento. This is the perfect space to saunter on a Sunday afternoon and get up close and personal with the artist herself, who will be there in person. Chat over nibbles and drinks about her new body of work that celebrates the beauty of the Peninsula and the life it gives its dwellers. There will be up to 15 new canvases on show with titles such as So Many Wineries, So Little Time, and a central piece of Janine’s sculpture taking pride of place — a black powder-coated steel tree of life. Meet Janine and muse on life, love and the human condition.

Janine’s work hangs in private collections across the globe including London, Los Angeles, New York, Hong Kong and Singapore, and she has just been a part of Manyung’s incredibly successful Hong Kong show. Her work is exhibited regularly and she has enjoyed sell-out exhibitions across Australia, Singapore and Chicago. Her exhibition at Manyung Gallery Sorrento is the ideal opportunity to meet a Peninsula artist of note and to purchase one of her fabulous new works that will be adored for years to come.

Janine Daddo – Champagne Confessions previews on Friday, June 8, ahead of its opening on Sunday, June 10.

 

MANYUNG GALLERY GROUP

A: Sorrento, Mount Eliza, Malvern, Flinders and Mornington (factory)

T: 9787 2953 all sites

W: manyunggallery.com.au

 

Five minutes with Dr Andrew McLean 

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The Human Elephant Learning Programs is about the conservation of Asian elephants. Tell us more.

Our focus is on the Asian elephants  that are in captivity so that they may live the best life possible. This means that their training is humane and ethically undertaken and that their management is best practice. The other side of the coin is the focus on the mahout and improving their lot as well through education. In the last couple of years, however, we have now begun to turn our sights on to conservation of elephants in general because the three projects are interdependent. Our hope is that someday all Asian elephants can live in free-range environments that will no longer require human interaction. However, until that time comes, the H-ELP Foundation is committed to creating the best life for elephants possible, using scientific, evidence-based training techniques and frameworks, and improving the lives of mahouts.

 

Tell us more about elephants in captivity. Is it a better option?

It isn’t a better option, it is just that there is nowhere near enough habitat for the 14,000 captives. In fact, there isn’t enough habitat for Asian elephants anywhere in Asia.  Even in Myanmar, which had one of the largest populations, the wild elephant populations are decimated in their structure. Males are much rarer than they were and most populations hang around human settlements because they feel safer due to the threat of poaching. The Asian elephant is highly threatened.  

 

What has H-ELP achieved of late?

As a result of our work in foundation-training and rehabilitation, The HELP Foundation is now the official training partner of The Wildlife Trust of India, The National Elephant Institute of Thailand and The MTE (the largest private owners of elephants in the world — 3000). The MTE located in Myanmar are attempting to rehabilitate elephants whose former lives were in hauling timber since there were world-wide restrictions on timber harvesting in Myanmar. The alternative is that the elephants will be bought by Chinese buyers and either used in unregulated tourism or ‘melted' down for traditional medicine. 

 

What can a patron learn by coming to the ball on June 16 at the Mornington Racecourse?

We are looking forward to showcasing our work through visual platforms  and I will present a talk that will educate and provide an insight. We heavily rely on donors and we are very grateful for the local support from individuals and companies across the Mornington Peninsula who are donating and contributing to the event. All the funds will be donated to on-the-ground workshops in multiple countries across Asia.

SUPPLIED

 

Belmar sponsors charity ball By Kate Sears

 There was plenty of fun and frivolity at last year’s Children of Ghana Charity Ball.

There was plenty of fun and frivolity at last year’s Children of Ghana Charity Ball.

The 2018 Children of Ghana Charity Ball warmly welcomes Belmar Real Estate as a major sponsor. Run by the Rotary Club of Frankston Sunrise, the annual fundraiser has made a massive difference to the lives of many children living in poverty in Ghana since Rotarian Tony Carter’s daughter Aimee spent time there in 2005, and Leanne Williams from Belmar Real Estate is delighted to be involved. “Having our brand associated with such a worthy cause is something that we are very proud of and we’re grateful to have received the opportunity to be involved,” Leanne said. “We’re always excited to support charities and we’re looking forward to not only participating but I’m one of the very few female auctioneers on the Peninsula and I’ll be conducting the auction on the night.” This wonderful gala night full of fantastic entertainment, including one of Australia’s best internationally acclaimed show bands and hosted by the beautiful Brodie Harper from Channel 9, is definitely a date to put on your calendar. It will be held at the Frankston Art Centre on Saturday, June 16.

 

 

 

 

Fine art thrives at Manyung Gallery By Liz Rogers

Drop by Manyung Gallery Mount Eliza and Sorrento next month to view the exquisite work of fine art originator and East Sydney Art School graduate student Barbara Tyson. Barbara’s detailed and highly individualised ‘movement-loving’ work hangs in private collections across the globe, and her undeniable portraiture is critically acclaimed.

Creating brushstrokes that enable the viewer to explore and define their own journey via the smooth softness of thick textures and detailed realism, Barbara uses varnishes to create a rich depth on the canvas. This is art to dive into and swim with the tide of heart-felt skill and expression while basking in the pure joy an experienced and confident painter delivers.

Manyung Gallery Group provides the perfect space to view this world-renowned artist’s work. Whether you are a drawing, illustration, portraiture or still-life enthusiast, or just admire the creativity of an artist whose career has spanned decades, June is the month to peruse and purchase that special piece of art for art’s sake.

Ground-breaking art is thriving at Manyung Gallery, and every admirer of fine art needs a Barbara Tyson. Take the time to find yours at Manyung Gallery Mount Eliza and Sorrento this winter and embrace the delightful play of light, freedom of expression and motivational movement of an artist’s joy in watching her subject come to life.

Immerse yourself in Barbara’s work from June 1-30 at Manyung Gallery Mount Eliza and Sorrento, and enjoy.

 

MANYUNG GALLERY GROUP

A: Mount Eliza, Sorrento, Malvern, Flinders and Mornington (factory)

T: 9787 2953 all sites

W: manyunggallery.com.au

 

Five minutes with Dr Andrew McLean 

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The Human Elephant Learning Programs is about the conservation of Asian elephants. Tell us more.

Our focus is on the Asian elephants  that are in captivity so that they may live the best life possible. This means that their training is humane and ethically undertaken and that their management is best practice. The other side of the coin is the focus on the mahout and improving their lot as well through education. In the last couple of years, however, we have now begun to turn our sights on to conservation of elephants in general because the three projects are interdependent. Our hope is that someday all Asian elephants can live in free-range environments that will no longer require human interaction. However, until that time comes, the H-ELP Foundation is committed to creating the best life for elephants possible, using scientific, evidence-based training techniques and frameworks, and improving the lives of mahouts.

Tell us more about elephants in captivity. Is it a better option?

It isn’t a better option, it is just that there is nowhere near enough habitat for the 14,000 captives. In fact, there isn’t enough habitat for Asian elephants anywhere in Asia.  Even in Myanmar, which had one of the largest populations, the wild elephant populations are decimated in their structure. Males are much rarer than they were and most populations hang around human settlements because they feel safer due to the threat of poaching. The Asian elephant is highly threatened.  

What has H-ELP achieved of late?

As a result of our work in foundation-training and rehabilitation, The HELP Foundation is now the official training partner of The Wildlife Trust of India, The National Elephant Institute of Thailand and The MTE (the largest private owners of elephants in the world — 3000). The MTE located in Myanmar are attempting to rehabilitate elephants whose former lives were in hauling timber since there were world-wide restrictions on timber harvesting in Myanmar. The alternative is that the elephants will be bought by Chinese buyers and either used in unregulated tourism or ‘melted' down for traditional medicine. 

What can a patron learn by coming to the ball on June 16 at the Mornington Racecourse?

We are looking forward to showcasing our work through visual platforms  and I will present a talk that will educate and provide an insight. We heavily rely on donors and we are very grateful for the local support from individuals and companies across the Mornington Peninsula who are donating and contributing to the event. All the funds will be donated to on-the-ground workshops in multiple countries across Asia.

Children of Ghana 8th annual charity ball By Cheryl Carter

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This impressive event run by the Rotary Club Frankston Sunrise has been making a massive difference to the lives of so many children living in poverty in Ghana since Rotary member Tony Carter’s daughter Aimee spent some time there in 2005.

Last year’s ball raised almost $27,000, enabling Rotary to help with major work at a local school in Kumasi along with a water project in a remote village. The Days for Girls Program was also supported.

This year’s event will be at the Frankston Arts Centre on Saturday, June 16. Included are savouries and drinks on arrival, a four-course meal and a very impressive line-up of talent to be enjoyed.

You can look forward to pre-dinner entertainment followed by the internationally acclaimed show band Big City Beat. They will have the whole place rocking, says Tony. The MC for the evening is the beautiful and talented Brodie Harper from Channel 9’s Postcards.

Sponsors already include Mercedes Benz Mornington, Mickey Blue, Bridgestone Tyres Frankston, Mornington Peninsula Magazine and Wise Choice Catering. The Charity warmly welcomes Belmar Real Estate as   major sponsor for 2018.

If you would like to part of this awesome event with sponsorship or donations, we’d love to hear from you.

For all information and ticket sales, please call Cheryl on 0400 516 265.

SUPPLIED

 

Paper craft all wrapped up

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From scrapbooking to card making, stamping to kids’ crafts – if your hobby involves paper, then you do not want to miss the next Peninsula Paper Craft Fair on Saturday, April 21.

The fair is one of two held each year – the next is on Saturday, December 1 – and it was started in 2015 at the Somerville Mechanics Hall by Somerville resident and keen paper crafter Jen. As the fair grew in size and popularity, Jen was joined by Sarah and Jo, who have helped turned the fair into what it is today.

Now at the Peninsula Community Theatre in Mornington, this month’s fair will include more than 20 stalls ranging from scrapbooking to card making to mixed media. So whether you’re a keen paper crafter or just embarking on this wonderful and absorbing hobby, head along between 10am-3pm and grab a coffee from Peninsula latte ladies, a toastie from Golden Toasties and check it out. You’ll be rapt.

 

An evening of choral delights

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If you haven’t experienced the charisma and magic of the Australian Chamber Choir in concert, here’s your chance. On Saturday, May 12, at 7.30pm, Mornington’s Peninsula Community Theatre will host the choir as it presents Essence of the Renaissance, with works from the Italian, Spanish and English schools.

Founding director David Lawrence established the Australian Chamber Choir in 2007, and it quickly won critical acclaim in Austria, France, Germany, Denmark, Italy, Poland and Switzerland, as well as in Australia. The Melbourne Observer wrote in 2007: “For the Australian Chamber Choir, an acknowledgement of a creative force that transcends faith and soars … with a devotion and assurance that is inspirational and affirming.”

With accomplished youthful members of the choir contributing, this will be an evening with dramatic touch and great promise. Tickets, which include complimentary pre-concert tastings of Bittern Estate wines, are available online at trybooking.com/360997, by phone on 9789 8392, from Farrells Bookshop in Mornington and Robinsons Bookshop in Frankston, and at the door an hour before the concert.